AKF Partners

Abbott, Keeven & Fisher PartnersPartners In Hyper Growth

Product Management Excellence

While not technical problem solvers, Product Managers arguably have the most difficult job in modern software development. Their core mission involves taking feedback from a diversity of sources (market trends, the business owner’s vision, the competitive landscape, customer complaints, feature usage statistics, engineering effort estimates) and somehow synthesize all these inputs into a single coherent vision (roadmap) and prioritized task list (product backlog). If that weren’t challenging enough by itself, they’re also on the hook for articulating feature implementations (through user stories and daily discussions with engineers) and for continually providing forecasts of feature release dates. (Btw, If anyone needs to know AKF’s position on whether or not you need dedicated full-time PMs read here.)

Given the difficulty of the task, it’s not surprising that many product owners fall short of excellence. In the worst cases, what was envisioned as a stream-lined agile development process devolves into waterfall by another name. Product sees developers as “ticket-takers” who can’t seem to work hard enough or fast enough to satisfy the wants of the business. To prevent this sort of downward slide into mediocrity and to keep your product management practices on point, below we’ve highlighted some key ways to differentiate a Great Product Manager from just a “Good” one.

Good Product Managers prioritize their backlog and communicate feature requirements through user stories and face-to-face discussions with engineers. Great Product Managers go beyond these core tasks and participate in Product Discovery and Product Validation. Product Discovery requires conducting market research to determine what the existing product might need to be (more) successful in the target market. This means watching market trends, tracking competitors, and keeping overall sense of where the competitive landscape is headed. Product Validation is quantifying the results of a feature release, asking if these met expectations, and learning how to make better predictions in the future. The very best PM’s establish “success metrics” for each and every feature prior to implementation.

Good Product Managers interact daily with their agile team. Great Product Managers are part of the agile team. They’re not simply interacting on an “as needed” basis; they’re an integral part of the agile process. They attend daily stand-ups and retrospectives, offer ideas on how to change course, and communicate continually with engineers about tradeoffs. They don’t just write a user story, they discuss the story with developers and test engineers to ensure everyone has a common understanding of what’s being built. If the Agile Team fails to deliver on time — or worse yet, builds the wrong feature — they own a part of that failure. If the Agile Team delivers a great release, they share that success with their teammates.

Good Product Managers prioritize new features that generate the greatest value to the business. They understand technical debt and aim to pay it down over time. Great Product Managers do all this, but also recognize that product management isn’t just accretive. It’s not about just about heaping feature after feature on your product until it’s saddled with bells and whistles. Great Product Managers put themselves in the end-user’s seat and choose to refactor, merge, or deprecate features when it makes sense to do so. Eliminating unused features helps to minimize technical debt. This feature selection process improves the maintainability of the code and gives end-users a clean interface that balances functionality and ease of use.

Good Product Managers avoid making mistakes. Great Product Managers recognize and retain a memory of mistakes and past failures. It’s all too easy to brush failed ideas under the carpet. Great Product Managers recognize this and choose to capitalize on their failures. They learn from mistakes and vow never to repeat them. They keep bad product ideas from being recycled and keep their teams focused on generating value.

Finally and most importantly:

Good Product Managers say “Yes” to ideas that create value to the business. Great Product Managers say “No” early and often to all but the most valuable ideas. You see, the problem most SaaS companies face isn’t a lack of ideas, but finding a way to identify the most promising ones and prioritizing them correctly. Keeping the team focused on delivering value requires the Product Manager to dish out a lot of ‘No’s to tasks that might steal from the team’s time.

It’s your engineering team’s job to build your product right, but your Product Manager is there to ensure that you build the right product. Building the Taj Mahal is no good if the customer really needed the Eiffel Tower! By no means is it an easy job, but by adopting these best practices your Product Managers can achieve excellence.

Steven Mason
Consultant, AKF Partners