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Microservices for Breadth, Libraries for Depth

April 10, 2018  |  Posted By: Marty Abbott

The decomposition of monoliths into services, or alternatively the development of new products in a services-oriented fashion (oftentimes called microservices), is one of the greatest architectural movements of the last decade.  The benefits of a services (alternatively microservices or micro-services) approach are clear:

  • Independent deployment, decreasing time to market and decreasing time to value realization– especially when continuous delivery is employed.
  • Team velocity and ownership (informed by Conway’s Law).
  • Increased fault isolation – but only when properly deployed (see below).
  • Individual scalability – and the decreasing cost of operations that entails when properly architected.
  • Freedom of implementation and technology choices – choosing the best solution for each service rather than subjecting services to the lowest common denominator implementation.

Unfortunately, without proper architectural oversight and planning, improperly architected services can also result in:

  • Lower overall availability, especially when those services are deployed in one of a handful of microservice anti-patterns like the mesh, services in depth (aka the Christmas Tree Light String) and the Fuse.
  • Higher (longer) response times to end customers.
  • Complicated fault isolation and troubleshooting that increases average recovery time for failures.
  • Service bloat:  Too many services to comprehend (see our service sizing post)

The following are patterns companies should avoid (anti-patterns) when developing services or microservices architectures:


The Mesh

Mesh architectures, where individual services both “fan out” and “share” subsequent services result in the lowest possible availability. 


Deep Series

Services that are strung together in long (deep) call trees suffer from low availability and slow page response times as calculated from the product of each service offering availability. 


The Fuse

The Fuse is a much smaller anti-pattern than “The Mesh”.  In “The Fuse”, 2 distinct services (A and B) rely on service C.  Should service C become slow or unavailable, both service A and B suffer.


Architecture Principle:  Services – Broad, But Never Deep

These services anti-patterns protect against a lack of fault isolation, where slowness and failures propagate along a synchronous path.  One service fails, and the others relying upon that service also suffer. 

They also serve to guard against longer latency in call streams.  While network calls tend to be minimal relative to total customer response times, many solutions (e.g. payment solutions) need to respond as quickly as possible and service calls slow that down.

Finally, these patterns help protect against difficult to diagnose failures.  The Xmas Tree pattern name is chosen because of the difficulty in finding the “failed bulb” in old tree lights wired in series.  Similarly, imagine attempting to find the fault in “The Mesh”.  The time necessary to find faults negatively effects service restoration time and therefore availability.

As such, we suggest a principal that services should never be deep but instead should be deployed in breadth along product offering boundaries defined by nouns (resources like “customer” or “sales”) or verbs (services like “search” or “add to cart”).  We often call this approach “slices instead of layers”.
How then do we accomplish the separation of software for team ownership, and time to market where a single service would otherwise be too large or unwieldy?

Old School – Libraries!

When you need service-like segmentation in a deep call tree but can’t suffer the availability impact and latency associated with multiple calls, look to libraries.  Libraries will both eliminate the network associated latency of a service call.  In the case of both The Fuse and The Mesh libraries eliminate the shared availability constraints.  Unfortunately, we still have the multiplicative effect of failure of the Xmas Tree, but overall it is a faster pattern.

“But My Teams Can’t Release Separately!”

Sure they can – they just have to change how they think about releasing.  If you need immediate effect from what you release and don’t want to release the calling services with libraries compiled or linked, consider performing releases with shared objects or dynamically loadable libraries.  While these require restarts of the calling service, simple automation will help you keep from having an outage for the purpose of deploying software.


AKF Partners helps companies architecture highly available, highly scalable microservice architecture products.  We apply our aggregate experience, proprietary models, patterns, and anti-patterns to help ensure your products can meet your company’s scale and availability goals.  Contact us today - we can help!

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