AKF Partners

Abbott, Keeven & Fisher PartnersPartners In Hyper Growth

The Phoenix Project – Book Review

After several friends recommended that I read the book The Phoenix Project, I at last downloaded it to my kindle and read it on one of my transcontinental flights. I really enjoyed it and thought it was both entertaining and enlightening which is difficult to accomplish. However, I don’t believe it goes far enough in describing how the most modern and efficient technology shops run. More about that later, first a recap.

The story line is that the fictional company, Parts Unlimited, is failing to keep up with competition and at risk of being split up and sold off. The root cause of the company’s issues are IT. We join the story after two IT executives are fired and the hero of our story, Bill, is asked to take over as the VP of IT Operations. He is introduced to his sensei, Erik, a tech / business / process genius, who leads Bill through the path to enlightenment by comparing IT Operations to a manufacturing plant. Through this journey the reader is introduced to concepts such as kanban, work-in-process (WIP), work centers, Theory of Constraints, Lean Startup, and the overarching concept of DevOps. In fact the book ends with most of the main characters at a party where Bill reflects “Maybe everyone attending this party is a form of DevOps, but I suspect it’s something much more than that. It’s Product Management, Development, IT Operations, and even Information Security all working together and supporting one another.”

I’m a fan of DevOps but to me the integration of tech ops and development is one small step for technology driven companies. In order to truly be nimble and effective, teams need to incorporate development, tech ops, product management, quality assurance, and any other function such as marketing or analytics that are needed to make the team autonomous. We’ve written about this concept several times The Agile Org, The Agile Org Solution, and The Agile Exec. We call these teams PODs and most importantly they need to be aligned to swim lanes in the architecture. By doing this, you essentially create mini-startups. These teams can make decisions themselves, deploy independently, and are responsible for their service from idea to production support.

I really enjoyed the book The Phoenix Project and I too highly recommend that you read it, especially if you are not familiar with the concepts mentioned above. As the authors are obviously talented writers and technologist, I would love to see them write another book that takes Parts Unlimited to the next level by creating autonomous teams. The authors hint at this concept when they state

“You’ve helped me see that IT is not merely a department. Instead, it’s pervasive, like electricity. It’s a skill, like being able to read or do math. Here at Parts Unlimited, we don’t have a centralized reading or math department—we expect everyone we hire to have some mastery of it. Understanding what technology can and can’t do has become a core competency that every part of this business must have. If any of my business managers are leading a team or a project without that skill, they will fail.”

Hopefully this is foreshadowing of another book to come.

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