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PDLC or SDLC

April 3, 2017  |  Posted By: AKF

As a frequent technology writer I often find myself referring to the method or process that teams use to produce software. The two terms that are usually given for this are software development life cycle (SDLC) and product development life cycle (PDLC). The question that I have is are these really interchangeable? I don’t think so and here’s why.

Wikipedia, our collective intelligence, doesn’t have an entry for PDLC, but explains that the product life cycle has to do with the life of a product in the market and involves many professional disciplines. According to this definition the stages include market introduction, growth, mature, and saturation. This really isn’t the PDLC that I’m interested in. Under new product development (NDP) we find a defintion more akin to PDLC that includes the complete process of bringing a new product to market and includes the following steps: idea generation, idea screening, concept development, business analysis, beta testing, technical implementation, commercialization, and pricing.

Under SDLC, Wikipedia doesn’t let us down and explains it as a structure imposed on the development of software products. In the article are references to multiple different models including the classic waterfall as well as agile, RAD, and Scrum and others.

In my mind the PDLC is the overarching process of product development that includes the business units. The SDLC is the specific steps within the PDLC that are completed by the technical organization (product managers included). An image on HBSC’s site that doesn’t seem to have any accompanying explanation depicts this very well graphically.

Another way to explain the way I think of them is to me all professional software projects are products but not all product development includes software development.  See the Venn diagram below. The upfront (bus analysis, competitive analysis, etc) and back end work (infrastructure, support, depreciation, etc) are part of the PDLC and are essential to get the software project created in the SDLC out the door successfully.  There are non-software related products that still require a PDLC to develop.

Do you use them interchangeably?  What do you think the differences are?

Reach out to AKF

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Definition of MVP

April 3, 2017  |  Posted By: AKF

We often use the term minimum viable product or MVP but do we all agree on what it means? In the Scrum spirt of Definition of Done, I believe the Definition of MVP is worth stating explicitly within your tech team. A quick search revealed these three similar yet different definitions:

     
  • A minimum viable product (MVP) is a development technique in which a new product or website is developed with sufficient features to satisfy early adopters. The final, complete set of features is only designed and developed after considering feedback from the product’s initial users. Source: Techopedia
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  • In product development, the minimum viable product (MVP) is the product with the highest return on investment versus risk…A minimum viable product has just those core features that allow the product to be deployed, and no more. Source: Wikipedia
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  • When Eric Ries used the term for the first time he described it as: A Minimum Viable Product is that version of a new product which allows a team to collect the maximum amount of validated learning about customers with the least effort.
    Source: Leanstack

I personally like a combination of these definitions. I would choose something along the lines of:

A minimum viable product (MVP) has sufficient features to solve a problem that exists for customers and provides the greatest return on investment reducing the risk of what we don’t know about our customers

Just like no two teams implement Agile the same way, we don’t all have to agree on the definition of MVP but all your team members should agree. Otherwise, what is an MVP to one person is a full featured product to another. Take a few minutes to discuss with your crossfunctional agile team and come to a decision on your Definition of MVP

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AKF Turns 10 – And It’s Still Not About the Tech

March 23, 2017  |  Posted By: AKF

The caller ID was blocked but Marty had been expecting the call.  Three “highly connected” people – donors, political advisers and “inner circle” people –  had suggested AKF could help. It was October 2013 and Healthcare.gov had launched only to crash when users tried to sign up. President Obama appointed Jeffrey Zients to mop up the post launch mess. Once the crisis was over, the Government Accountability Office (GAO) released its postmortem citing inadequate capacity planning, software coding errors, and lack of functionality as root causes. AKF’s analysis was completely different – largely because we think differently than most technologists. While our findings indicated the bottlenecks that kept the site from scaling, we also identified failures in leadership and a dysfunctional organization structure.  These latter, and more important, problems prevented the team from identifying and preventing recurring issues.

We haven’t always thought differently. Our early focus in 2007 was to help companies overcome architectural problems related to scale and availability. We’ve helped our clients solve some of the largest and challenging problems ever encountered – cyber Monday ecommerce purchasing, Christmas day gift card redemption, and April 15th tax filings. But shortly after starting our firm, we realized there was something common to our early engagements that created and sometimes turbocharged the technology failures. This realization, that people and processes – NOT TECHNOLOGY–  are the causes of most failures led us to think differently.  Too often we see technology leaders focusing too much on the technology and not enough on leading, growing, and scaling their teams.

We challenge the notion that technology leaders should be selected and promoted based on their technical acumen. We don’t accept that a technical leader should spend most of her time making the biggest technical decisions.  We believe that technical executives, to be successful, must first be a business executive with great technical and business acumen.  We teach teams how to analyze and successfully choose the appropriate architecture, organization, and processes to achieve a business outcome. Product effort is meaningless without a measurable and meaningful business outcome and we always put outcomes, not technical “religion” first.

If we can teach a team the “AKF way” the chance of project and business success increases dramatically. This may sound like marketing crap (did we mention we are also irreverent?), but our clients attest to it.  This is what Terry Chabrowe, CEO eMarketer, said about us:

AKF served as our CTO for about 8 months and helped us make huge improvements in virtually every area related to IT and engineering. Just as important, they helped us identify the people on our team who could move into leadership positions. The entire AKF team was terrific. We’d never have been able to grow our user base tenfold without them.

A recent post claimed that 93% of successful companies abandon their original strategy.  This is certainly true for AKF. Over the past 10 years we’ve massively changed our strategy of how we “help” companies. We’ve also quadrupled our team size, worked with over 350 companies, written three books, and most importantly made some great friendships. Whether you’ve read our books, engaged with our company, or connected with us on social media, thanks for an amazing 10 years. We look forward to the next 10 years, learning, teaching, and changing strategies with you.

 

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