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Enterprise Cloud Computing – Book Review

A topic of particular interest to us is cloud computing so I picked up a copy of Gautum Shroff’s Enterprise Cloud Computing: Technology, Architecture, Applications published in 2010 by Cambridge University Press. Overall I enjoyed the book and thought it covered some great topics but there were a few topics that I wanted the author to cover in more depth.

Enterprise Cloud Computing Book Cover

The publisher states that the book is “intended primarily for practicing software architects who need to assess the impact of such a transformation.” I would recommend this book for architects, engineers, and managers who are not currently well versed with cloud computing. For individuals who already possess a familiarity on these subject this will not be in depth enough nor will it have enough practical advice on when to consider the different applications.

Of minor issue to me is that this book spends a good deal of time upfront covering the evolution of the internet into a cloud computing platform. A bigger issue to me is that coverage of topics is done very well at an academic or theoretical level but doesn’t follow through enough on the practical side. For example, Shroff’s coverage of topics such as MapReduce in Chapter 11 are thorough in describing how the internal functionality but fall short on when, how, or why to actually implement them in an enterprise architecture. In this 13 page chapter, he unfortunately only gives one page to the practical application of batch processing using MapReduce. He revisits this topic in other chapters such as Chapter 16 “Enterprise analytics and search” and does an excellent job explaining how it works but his coverage of the when, how, or why this should be implemented is not given enough attention.

He picks up the practical advice in the final Chapter 18 “Roadmap for enterprise cloud computing”. Here he suggests several ways companies should consider using cloud and Dev 2.0 (Force.com and TCS InstantApps). I would like to have seen this practical side implemented throughout the book.

I really enjoyed Shroff”s coverage of the economics of cloud computing in Chapter 6. He addresses the issue by showing how he compares the in-house (collocation center) vs cloud. Readers can adopt his approach using their own numbers to produce a similar comparison.

The book does a great job covering the fundamentals of enterprise computing, including a technical introduction to enterprise architecture. It will of interest to programmers and software architects who are not yet familiar with these topics. It is suggested by the publisher that this book could serve as a reference for a graduate-level course in software architecture or software engineering, I agree.


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